Categories of Non Performing Assets (NPA’s)

Non Performing Assets (NPA’s)

Non performing asset means an asset or account  of borrower ,which has been classified by bank or financial institution  as sub –standard , doubtful or loss asset, in accordance  with  the direction or guidelines  relating   to assets  classification issued  by RBI.

An asset, including a leased asset, becomes non-performing when it ceases to generate income for the bank.

A ‘non-performing asset’ (NPA) was defined as a credit facility in respect of which the interest and/ or instalment of principal has remained ‘past due’ for a specified period of time.

With a view to moving towards international best practices and to ensure greater transparency, it has been decided to adopt the ‘90 days’ overdue’ norm for identification of NPAs, from the year ending March 31, 2004. Accordingly, with effect from March 31, 2004, a non-performing asset (NPA) shall be a loan or an advance where;

  • Interest and/ or instalment of principal remain overdue for a period of     more than 90 days in respect of a term loan,
  • The account remains ‘out of order’ for a period of more than 90 days, in respect of an Overdraft/Cash Credit (OD/CC),
  • The bill remains overdue for a period of more than 90 days in the case of bills purchased and discounted,
  • Interest and/or instalment of principal remains overdue for two harvest seasons but for a period not exceeding two half years in the case of an advance granted for agricultural purposes, and
  • Any amount to be received remains overdue for a period of more than 90 days in respect of other accounts.

NPA Categories: Standard Assets

Standard assets are the ones in which the bank is receiving interest as well as the principal amount of the loan regularly from the customer. Here it is also very important that in this case the arrears of interest and the principal amount of loan does not exceed 90 days at the end of financial year. If asset fails to be in category of standard asset that is amount due more than 90 days then it is NPA and NPAs are further need to classify in sub categories.

Banks are required to classify non-performing assets further into the following three categories based on the period for which the asset has remained non-performing and the realisability of the dues:

  1. Sub-standard Assets
  2. Doubtful Assets
  3. Loss Assets

Sub-standard Assets:

With effect from 31 March 2005, a sub standard asset would be one, which has remained NPA for a period less than or equal to 12 month.  The following features are exhibited by sub standard assets: the current net worth of the borrowers / guarantor or the current market value of the security charged is not enough to ensure recovery of the dues to the banks in full; and the asset has well-defined credit weaknesses that jeopardise the liquidation of the debt and are characterised by the distinct possibility that the banks will sustain some loss, if deficiencies are not corrected.

Doubtful Assets:

A loan classified as doubtful has all the weaknesses inherent in assets that were classified as sub-standard, with the added characteristic that the weaknesses make collection or liquidation in full, – on the basis of currently known facts, conditions and values – highly questionable and improbable.

With effect from March 31, 2005, an asset would be classified as doubtful if it remained in the sub-standard category for 12 months.

Loss Assets:

A loss asset is one which considered uncollectible and of such little value that its continuance as a bankable asset is not warranted- although there may be some salvage or recovery value.  Also, these assets would have been identified as ‘loss assets’ by the bank or internal or external auditors or the RBI inspection but the amount would not have been written-off wholly.

Source: Scribd.com

About Abey Francis

Abey Francis is the founder of MBAKnol - A Blog about Management Theories and Practices - and he's always happy to share his passion for innovative management practices. You can found him on Google+ and Facebook. If you’d like to reach him, send him an email to: [email protected]

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